Miss q 4th annual virtual final
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Narcan event 2020
ADCARE TO HOST VIRTUAL NARCAN TRAINING AUGUST 25 at 4:00 PM
(August 12, 2020, Worcester, MA) –AdCare will host a free, virtual training Tuesday, August 25 at 4:00 PM on how to administer the overdose reversing drug Narcan® and potentially save a life.  Keith Barnaby, CADC, harm reduction specialist with AIDS Project Worcester, will lead the Narcan training and live chat Q&A. Join from your computer, tablet or smartphone: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/497317469 or dial in using your phone:+1 (408) 650-3123.  Access Code: 497-317-469.
The U.S. Surgeon General urges family, friends, and individuals at risk for an opioid overdose to keep Narcan on hand.  AdCare’s Narcan training August 25 at 4:00 PM is being held in honor of International Overdose Awareness Day (August 31, 2020), an opportunity to remember those lost to overdose and underscore the message that overdose death is preventable and more must be done to save lives.
Experience matters. For nearly 45 years, AdCare has provided life-changing alcohol and drug treatment at our hospital in Worcester, Massachusetts, outpatient programs throughout Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and our residential treatment program in North Kingstown, RI. For more information about AdCare programs, call 1-800-ALCOHOL (252-6465) or visit AdCare.com.
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HERE ARE THIS YEAR'S 20 AMAZING RECIPIENTS...
THANK YOU FOR MAKING WORCESTER SMILE!


“The Big 3” (for keeping our city safe—City Manager Edward Augustus,
Medical Director Michael Hirsh MD, Mayor Joseph Petty
),

Melanie Bonsu, State Senator Harriette L. Chandler, Ricky Duran,
Judge Martha Grace, Judi Kirk, Satya Mitra, Ph.D., AiVi Nguyen Esq., Alisan Porter,
POW! WOW! Worcester, St. John’s Food Pantry, stART on the Street,
Imrana Soofi, Nellie Toney, Dolly Vazquez,
Vision for Worcester (Paul Demoga, Esq., Edward Madaus) Dee Wells, James Welu,
WooFood Favorites (George’s Coney Island, Table Talk Pies),
Worcester Women’s Oral History Project


CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL!

Worcester Historical Museum is proud to honor the memory of and legacy of Harvey Ball and his world-famous creation, Smiley Face. The “Harvey” is presented annually to an individual, organization, or group of individuals whose commitments have made a difference in the city of Worcester…and helped people throughout the community smile.

This year’s Harvey Ball will feature a week-long online silent auction by very talented artists, a facemask challenge, pre-packaged dinners for purchase to enjoy the night of The Ball, and even an online merchandising shoppe to purchase Smiley party favors.

Program details, along with ticket and sponsor information, will be available shortly.

Start planning your exciting evening now! Maybe support a local restaurant with a party of 10 and zoom into The Ball together, have a party of 10 for a backyard dinner, or enjoy the entertainment in your pajamas...to support the Museum and it's collection of history - from yesterday to today and tomorrow.

Don't forget to brighten someone's day by sending them a electronic smile HERE and
view fun photos of past Balls HERE.
 

Covid Radio: Local Stations strategizing

Full Article Here

By Craig S. Semon 
Telegram & Gazette Staff 
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Posted Aug 5, 2020 at 4:00 PM
Updated at 8:33 AM

Commercial radio stations WXLO, The Pike and Nash Icon are not the only local stations strategizing how to be socially distant while staying socially relevant.

Ernest “Ernie” C. Floyd is the executive producer of Unity Radio – WUTY 97.9 FM and host of his own evening listening program, “Smooth Grooves.”

“Initially, it affected us because we had a routine where people were coming in on a regular basis and we were rotating the hosts, rotating the guests, and we were just getting our rhythm, as far as getting exposure in the community,” Floyd said. “All of a sudden COVID comes in. It shut everything down for a good number of weeks.”

Only on the air for three years, Unity Radio started playing repeat programs, as they tried to figure out its next move.
“The coronavirus forced us to get technical and when we got technical we got into the Zoom like everybody else, Floyd said. “When we realized what Zoom could do, person to person, at home, then we said well how can we transfer that into radio? So, we started doing Zoom interviews on the radio.”
Now, Unity Radio is doing some interviews in its Waldo Street studio.

“We continue to wipe microphones and computer desk tops and the desks and people come in with masks and we separate them,” Floyd said. “We feel as though we’re getting our rhythm back and we’re starting to get good underwriters. We’re starting to get recommended for grants now. And people are reaching out to us to support the station.”

Slowly but surely, Unity Radio’s 15 radio personalities and disc jockeys started coming back around three weeks ago. Only a few are still broadcasting from home, Floyd said.

“When COVID hit, and we had that three to six week layoff. Then, we started being creative and innovative with Zoom and then we learned TeamViewer,” Floyd said. “We learned how to edit and then we learned how to come up with a format to insert the shows on MP3 from remotely or our producer would come in by himself and just lay the schedule out. Now, we’re able to do a live show with our guest sitting six feet apart. And, then, we have people call in Zoom and we’re able to pop them up on the screen. We’re able to talk to them. So it’s pretty cool.”

WUTY EVENTS

 
LISTEN NOW!
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Worcester Historical Museum Triva Time

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The Covid-19 Chronicles

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Worcester Historical Museum is hosting: PRETTY POWERFUL: 100 Years of Voting & Style

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote through the changing roles of women and fashion.
http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07eh82ta5c5b9289ec&llr=va4dso9ab
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BraveHearts Summer Camp

BraveHearts Summer Camp Starting Soon!
August 10th-14th https://worcesterbravehearts.com/kids/summer-camps/
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As part of our commitment to the community, the Whitin Community Center is pleased to offer the following Red Cross certified courses this Winter, for ages 15 and older. Pre-registration is required.
First Aid, CPR & AED for Adult & Child
Tuesday, February 25
5:30-9:30pm

$70 Members
$85 Guests

Ar 191019646


One on One: Dennis Gorman, attorney at Fletcher Tilton, guitarist for In-Xpensive Winos

WORCESTER — By day, Dennis Gorman works as an attorney at Fletcher Tilton PC, assisting clients in areas that include estate, trust, tax, charitable organizations and corporate practice.
At night, he can be found jamming on his guitar as a member of In-Xpensive Winos, a band that plays classic rock tunes by the Rolling Stones, Aerosmith, Jeff Beck and Foghat (to name a few) in clubs and at events, largely in Central Massachusetts and surrounding communities. In-Xpensive Winos will perform a fundraiser Friday at Fiddler’s Green, 19 Temple St., to benefit the nonprofit jazz radio station WICN 90.5-FM.
After graduating from St. Peter’s High School in Worcester, Gorman received his undergraduate degree in accounting from Nichols College, a master’s degree in taxation from Bentley University and his J.D. cum laude from Suffolk University. In 998 he joined Fletcher Tilton, Worcester’s oldest law firm.
Why did you go into law and was it something you always wanted to do?
I’m a CPA as well as a lawyer. When I was working in public accounting, one of my friends was going to law school and I got the idea to go into the field from him. Clients, when they were in dire straits, would call their lawyers before their accountants. It looked more interesting and challenging than what I was doing, so I decided to bite the bullet and go to school at night. I probably did 90 hours weekly for five or six years between getting my CPA and law degree.
What are your specialty areas and why did you focus on them?
Because I’m a CPA and had my master’s in taxes, I was able to get back to advising businesses and doing estate planning, estate and trust work. ... It was just a natural fit for my background.
When did your interest in music begin?
I was 7 or 8 when the Beatles came out in 1964. I’ve always loved music. My generation grew up with all the British bands. I took lessons in the early and mid-’60s for a while but then dropped it and always regretted that. About eight years ago, my son bought me a guitar for Christmas and so I immediately started taking lessons ... and went from there.
Then I formed a band, almost right from the beginning, because the only way you are going to get good at playing is if you get up in front of people. The band has evolved over time.
Tell us about the band and the music you play.
The band is called the In-Xpensive Winos. Keith Richards is my favorite musician and the Rolling Stones is my favorite band. One of Keith’s side projects was called X-Pensive Winos, so I used a variation of that name. We play classic rock from 1965 to the 1980s.
Janis Joplin, Credence Clearwater Revival, ZZ Top ... a lot of mainstream stuff. Largely we play in Worcester and surrounding towns. We played in Greenwich Village in New York City at the Bitter End. ... That was a blast. It’s the oldest club and we played there a month and a half after Lady Gaga went back to perform. It’s where she started out.
We just did a big show at the new Beer Garden Pavilion in Worcester, a really cool place.
What skills do you need to do both jobs? Are there similarities?
I’m kind of a front person in the band, although I have two lead vocalists. I sing a little bit but I tend to be the person on the microphone working the crowd.
I’m an outgoing person. In my profession, I think most successful lawyers are outgoing and at ease with people and able to communicate with them. I’ve been able to help develop a good following for the band ... being engaging and schmoozing.
Is there a standout experience from a concert you can share?
There was an instance when I was singing a song early on in my career and I completely forgot the words. I got brain fry so I just sang anything.
After the show, I asked people in the audience whether they picked up on that and they said, “Geez, no, we didn’t.” My guess is that musicians do that a lot and just have to wing it.